What’s on your Bookshelf – July

Once again it’s time to review what everyone’s been reading for July. This is a challenge set by Debbie, Sue, Donna and Jo. I missed last month’s so I have a few more than the usual number of books to post.

I’ll start with a series of two books set in the city of Jaipur, India in the 1950’s through to the late 1960’s. The Henna Artist is the story of 17 year old Lakshmi who escapes an abusive marriage to become a famous henna artist and confidante to the wealthy women of the upper classes. The Secret Keeper of Jaipur follows the story of Malik, once a homeless urchin who is taken in by Lakshmi to help her carry her tools around. This story starts with the now educated Malik apprenticed at the Facilities Office of the Jaipur Royal Palace. Over the years he has learned a great many things, mostly how to observe and listen.

I enjoyed both of these books immensely and they kept me up late into the night to see how things panned out for both of these wonderful characters. 5/5

London, 1980s. Though she has a comfortable, privileged life, Eva Martรญnez-Green is deeply unhappy. The only child of an emotionally absent mother and a physically absent father, Eva has grown up in a cold, unloving house. But Eva is convinced that all is not as it seems. Why are there no baby pictures of her? Why do her parents avoid all questions about her early years? Goodreads

An intriguing read and one I followed avidly to find out the answers Eva was searching for. 5/5

Over the years I have read all of Tim Weaver’s books. They have all been so different. I admire they way he comes up with a different plot line for each book. This one was no exception. A bit far fetched but I still enjoyed every page. The story of a missing couple, presumed dead, but no bodies have ever been found. Another case for Raker! I have posted the link so that the books can be read in order. If you like crime thrillers you won’t be disappointed. 4/5

A completely different book this time from Dervla McTiernan. This one is set in America and not Ireland as in the previous books. Law student, Hannah Rokeby, blackmails her way into The Innocence Project. A group of people helping to set Death Row prisoners free after all other options have failed. Hannah has other ideas about a certain prisoner though. Intriguing with many twists and turns and will keep you guessing until the end. 5/5

This was a bookclub choice by one of our ladies, who also knew the author. It portrays the story of Lady Godiva who rode through the streets naked as a forfeit to her husband, Lord Leofric of Mersea, so that her people wouldn’t have to pay taxes, to stop them from starving. It tells the story of her upbringing and marriage and the threat to England from the constant Viking invasions.
For me this book lacked excitement and I felt there was a lot of padding. An okay read. 3/5

At the moment I am having trouble finding a book that keeps me interested after the first few chapters. I am so glad I have a kindle so I can download a sample! Although this does make for less discipline about finishing a book. I will be looking out for some recommendations from other bloggers who post for this challenge.

I’ll leave you with these descriptions to help with further book reviews.

16 comments

  1. So many great reads here Ali, thanks for joining us this month. I am off to look at the Tim Weaver series. I enjoyed The Murder Rule but for some reason it didn’t grab me like her previous books had. The Indian books also sound great, I loved our visit to Jaipur. That final meme on book descriptions made me laugh! I’m all set to get on the plane this week with my 7kg of carry-on and many books on Kindle and Audible ready to go!

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.